ANOTHER “FREE LUNCH” FOR YOU

YOUR LUNCH

No strings attached! My book of poetry for you and those close to your heart has been chosen by the Onlinebookclub.org (1 million members) as its Book of the Day on Saturday, May 25. Its choice was based on a terrific, 4-Star-out-of-4 stars Book Review by its professional staff of reviewers. To celebrate, I have arranged with Amazon to give you a FREE eBook of The Golden Window. Who says there are no Free Lunches anymore?

Obtain one for yourself, your family members, and as gifts for friends. Please pass the word along to the contacts you have. The giveaway starts TODAY Friday, May 24, and continues through next Monday, May 27. Simply Log in to AMAZON.com and go to the book department. Look under Steven C. Brandt or The Golden Window and scroll down.

I appreciate your interest. Starting Today, May 24, you also can simply Click herehttp://bit.ly/thegoldenwindowbk

For more information on the book, Click here: scbwords.com   

Your Server/Author, Steve
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A WOMAN’S PREROGATIVE—UPDATE


 

 

click  CLICK: https://booklife.com/authors/04/26/2019/booklife-talks-with-steven-c-brandt.html


AND NOW, the REST of THE STORY…

There was an excellent turnout for the April 20th promotion of A Woman’s Prerogative by Amazon/Kindle and the OnineBookClub.org with its million members around the world. 800+ people signed on for a FREE ebook edition download of the novel. Publishers Weeklya legend for its terrific distribution connection to 30,000 bookstores everywhere—then put water on the flowers with a featured interview of this author in a Q & A format. It’s up on the top of this message. Thank all of you who responded to the April opportunity for a free “lunch.”

COMING UP

On May 25 the team above will do a similar promotion for The Golden Windowmy Collection #1 of poems. I have had a heart-warming reaction from readers of many of the quite-different poems in the book—my virgin trek into the mountains of poetry. Of course, writing some of the poems about or for my wife, Judy, was and is wistful to me. (This May 25 would have been her 81stbirthday; July 11, our 60thanniversary.) Caregiving is the name of the book’s last section.

I will send the details of the upcoming promotion to you in the next week after which I will be getting cataracts removed. The promotion centerpiece will be…ANOTHER FREE LUNCH! Just mark the date + the two days before and the two days after, and check into the book via Amazon Books between May 23—27. The poems are a thought-full gift to friends, family, children, and grandchildren, etc. who might find inspiration or joy or humor in one or more of the poems in the six main Parts of the book: Self-Reliance; Living Full; Nature; Joys; Sorrows; and Caregiving. Plus…it was written for folks who don’t usually do poetry, which was my case until about six years ago. Live and learn!

Steve

P.S. To get directly to me, you can Bookmark and visit-at-will my new blog at  Http://www.stevenbrandt.com/blog Sample it. Send me a comment or suggestion. I’d love to hear a skosh from you.

 

Something my mother never told me: Sometimes the dragon wins  —scb

SCB Mobile & Home Phone: 530 386 5681 

 

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A CLOSE LOOK AT AN INSIDIOUS ISSUE EATING AT THE ROOTS OF FREEDOM & OUR COUNTY, AMERICA

This is an article by Abigail Disney—yes, one of THE Disney family members—who is the president of Fork Films, founder of Peace is Loud and co-founder of Level Forward. It may test some of your views of management as it did mine, and I was a teacher of the subject for 21 years at a leading graduate school of business. The link direct to THE WASHINGTON POST article is at the bottom of this posting of it.   –scb 

This past weekend, I seem to have struck a nerve with a Twitter thread about wage inequality at the Walt Disney Co. — it is important to note that I speak only for myself and not for my family. The thread went viral, partly because of my name. But I suspect it would be far harder to get that reaction if my last name were Procter or Gamble. That’s because the Disney brand occupies a special place in our economic landscape. Its profits are powered by emotion and sentiment and, yes, something as fundamental as the difference between right and wrong. I believe that Disney could well lead the way, if its leaders so chose, to a more decent, humane way of doing business.

I had to speak out about the naked indecency of chief executive Robert Iger’s pay. According to Equilar, Iger took home more than $65 million in 2018. That’s 1,424 times the median pay of a Disney worker. To put that gap in context, in 1978, the average CEO made about 30 times a typical worker’s salary. Since 1978, CEO pay has grown by 937 percent, while the pay of an average worker grew just 11.2 percent.

This growth in inequality has affected every corner of American life. We are increasingly a lopsided, barbell nation, where the middle class is shrinking, a very few, very affluent people own a great deal and the majority have relatively little. What is more, as their wealth has grown, the super-rich have invested heavily in politicians, policies and social messaging to pad their already grotesque advantages.

In 2017, with the quiet encouragement of corporations across the country, Congress passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. As billions of dollars landed in the laps of management, they spent as a rule not on their workforces but on wealth-enriching strategies such as stock buybacks and, yes, executive pay.

In 2018, Disney gave more than 125,000 employees a $1,000 bonus. But that $125 million or so was dwarfed by the $3.6 billion it spent to buy shares back to drive up its stock price and thus enrich its shareholders. Given that about 85 percent of stocks are held by the richest people in the country, this was a significant new investment in wealth inequality.

I have been quietly grumbling about this issue for some time now, uncertain how public to be. It is time to call out the men and women who lead us and to draw a line in the sand about how low we are prepared to let hard-working people sink while top management takes home ever-more-outrageous sums of money. It is unreasonable to expect corporate boards to act as a check on this trend; they are almost universally made up of CEOs, former CEOs and people who long to be CEOs.

Disney has pushed back by noting that it pays more than the $7.25 federal minimum wage. This argument fails to acknowledge that the cost of living varies from place to place and few can make do on that, no matter where they live. It also fails to recognize that the company worked quietly to try to defeat a ballot initiative to lift the minimum wage paid by certain employers to $15 an hour in Anaheim, Calif., which passed this past November.

At a company that has never been more profitable, whose top executives drive home with seven- and eight-figure paychecks and whose primary resource is the good-spirited, public-facing people who greet guests day after day, why are we dancing around a minimum wage anyway? I’m not arguing that Iger and others do not deserve bonuses. They do. They have led the company brilliantly. I am saying that the people who contribute to its success also deserve a share of the profits they have helped make happen.

There are just over 200,000 employees at Disney. If management wants to improve life for just the bottom 10 percent of its workers, Disney could probably set aside just half of its executive bonus pool, and it would likely have twice as much as it would need to give that bottom decile a $2,000 bonus. Besides, at the pay levels we are talking about, an executive giving up half his bonus has zero effect on his quality of life. For the people at the bottom, it could mean a ticket out of poverty or debt. It could offer access to decent health care or education for a child.

Here is my suggestion to the Walt Disney Co. leadership. Lead. If any of this rings any moral bells for you, know that you are uniquely situated to model a different way of doing business. Reward all of your workers fairly. Don’t turn away when they tell you they are unable to make ends meet. You do not exist merely for the benefit of shareholders and managers. Reward all the people who make you successful, help rebuild the American middle class and respect the dignity of the men and women who work just as hard as you do to make Disney the amazing company it is.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/its-time-to-call-out-my-familys-company–and-anyone-else-rich-off-their-workers-backs/2019/04/23/5d4e6838-65ef-11e9-82ba-fcfeff232e8f_story.html
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FREE LUNCH for YOU

No strings attached! My new novel, A Woman’s Prerogative, has been chosen by the Online Book Club’s (1 million members) as its Book of the Day on Saturday, April 21 based on a terrific, 4-Star-out-of-4 Stars Book Review by its professional staff of reviewers. To celebrate, I have arranged with Amazon to give you a FREE eBook of the novel. Who says there are No Free Lunches anymore!

 

Get one for yourself, your family members, as gifts for friends, and pass the word along to contacts you have. The giveaway starts this Thursday and continues through next Monday. 

I appreciate your interest. Starting Thursday, April 18, simply Click herehttp://bit.ly/womansprerogativebk

For more information on the book, Click here: 

scbwords.com   

Steve

 

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PERSPECTIVE ON WRITING

Writing fiction is a creative challenge. Each word and sentence must carry its own weight. There is no music, color, or sound-effect dramatizing or softening the author-intended meaning. No motion picture helps cover gaps or adds pacing to the story. Other than five b & w illustrations, my new book, A Woman’s Prerogative, rides on the back of the nearly 100 thousand words between the covers…plus one other vital ingredient: you, the reader. You choose when to open it; you bring your mood, set the pace, and inject your own self and values into the spaces between words as you read See my comment below about three different readers. It’s your novel, too, when you finish! On my end, creating and launching Prerogative consumed much of my last two years. I loved writing it…for you.

Here’s an excerpt from Chapter 34 in the book: “Quid finally twisted the radio knob hard to OFF and it broke into his hand. He threw the pieces out the open window. Bam! Bam! Bam! He slammed the dashboard with his hand.

I’M CURSED!” he screamed out into Death Valley as he mashed down on the accelerator. The old stick-shift truck shuddered as it gained speed reluctantly. 

“GOD HATES ME AND THE DEVIL DOESN’T WANT ME! he yelled.

“Even the Devil doesn’t want me,” he croaked again, and he eased up on the pedal. The truck speedometer retreated counterclockwise downward from ninety as the truck pressed on reluctantly across the endless desert.”

Recently Prerogative earned a 4-Star-rating-out-of 4 stars by a professional Reviewer. A condensed version is below. I also receive, and appreciate, regular, unsolicited, testimonials from readers I know and many I don’t know. I anchored three such testimonials below to show the differences those individuals readers had in their feelings about just the book’s ending. Very interesting. Professional reviewers try to present an objective point of view.

Both women and men seem attracted to this “Romantic Thriller with Historical Roots.” Be sure to read the brief but 99.9% true Prologue and the EndNote. In Prerogative, the targeted audience is women and men in—particularly those who prefer realistic thrillers built out of ordinary life experiences rather than spy rings, muscles, killing, guns, or make-believe circumstances.

In closing, here are three of the testimonials received chosen because they each hone in on the ending: 

              “What a book! The story moves right along. I found the interwoven plots were intricate but easy to follow. The details of Greta salvaging a family business while Alex has a go at trying to find a long-lost gold mine were fascinating. But the abrupt, surprise ending left me uneasy.” -D. Norris, author of, “I’ll Go-Reflections from 61 Years of Ministry.”

               “It’s 3 AM Wednesday morning in wintery Cleveland and I just finished the book. Could not put it down. It’s solid, front to back. I liked the ending and saw it coming.” -J. Cindrich, Croatia and USA.

               “I found Alex, 34, and the two supporting men, Quid, 27, and Frank, 65, to be well-developed characters. I could easily conjure images of Alex as a handsome, hi-tech geologist and professor as well as a romantic; Frank,65, a wizened but wise gold prospector with a big heart; and Quid, Alex’s reckless younger brother who was both funny and dangerous at times. I was less able to connect with wealthy Greta, 32, the primary woman in the story. While I appreciated Brandt’s focus on portraying her as a knowledgeable, assertive business-woman with political ambitions, I felt she lacked depth and warmth. Despite my feelings about Greta, I appreciated the book’s realistic conclusion, which was satisfying + likely, given the page-turner subtleties of the story. Additionally, the book appears to have been professionally edited, as I only noted a few errors in Greta’s lively business-turnaround efforts and Alex’s complicated role as a lover, geologist, advisor, brother, and school teacher.              

Steve

P.S. The color photo up top is of this writer and “Frank” (in the book) a few years ago.

 

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ANNOUNCEMENT

Aboard AH-Haa in San Pablo Bay north of S.F.

 

BIG BOOK PROMOTIONS COMING in APRIL & MARCH on AMAZON & OBC* They include a Free Lunch for YOU!

Click on my website & blog: www.stevenbrandt.com for up-to-date info on the newest novel, A Woman’s Prerogative. And The Golden Window-—Collection I – Poems. Separately, each received 4-Stars-out-of-4 Stars Book Reviews from different professional reviewers at OBC* www.Onlinebookclub.org

 

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PERSPECTIVE & NEWS ON “A WOMAN’S PREROGATIVE”

Alex and Greta spend some time at nearby Lake Tahoe on the border between Nevada and California

PERSPECTIVE

Writing fiction is a creative challenge. Each word and sentence must carry its own weight. There is no music, color, or sound-effect dramatizing or softening the author-intended meaning. No motion picture helps cover gaps or adds pacing to the story. Other than six b&w illustrations, my new book, A Woman’s Prerogative, rides on the back of the nearly 100 thousand words between the covers…plus one other vital ingredient: you, the reader. You choose when to open it; you bring your mood, set the pace, and inject your own self and values into the spaces between words as you read.  It’s your novel, too, when you finish!

Creating and launching Prerogative consumed much of my last two years. It is now wading its way through the monsoon of books customarily falling from the sky this holiday season. Hooray!

Here’s an excerpt from Chapter 34 in the book:

“Quid finally twisted the radio knob hard to OFF, and it broke into his hand. He threw the pieces out the open window. Bam! Bam! Bam! He slammed the dashboard with his hand.

“I’M CURSED!” he screamed out into Death Valley as he mashed down on the accelerator. The old stick-shift truck shuddered as it gained speed reluctantly. “GOD HATES ME AND THE DEVIL DOESN’T WANT ME!” he yelled.

“Even the Devil doesn’t want me,” he croaked again, and he eased up on the pedal. The truck speedometer retreated counterclockwise downward from ninety as the truck pressed on reluctantly across the endless desert.”

NEWS

The book is selling briskly in both the digital (eBook) and Print editions. It is just starting to show up in local bookstores and online retailers as it takes time to get out through the pipelines. FYI: The ISBN number is 978-1-7322108-4-4. Ask any book retailer to look it up if it is not yet in stock.

In November Prerogative earned a 4-star rating out of 4 stars by a professional Reviewer. A condensed version is below. I also receive regular, unsolicited, testimonials from readers I know and many I don’t know. I anchored three such testimonials below to show the differences those individuals readers had in their feelings about just the book’s ending. Very interesting.

My publishing team and I just reduced the price 30+% for both editions to encourage readers to use them as gifts. ‘Tis the season. Print is now $14.99; eBook is $9.99. And Amazon, for one retailer, may have Special Deals running.

Both women and men seem attracted to this “Romantic Thriller with Historical Roots.” Be sure to read the brief but 99.9% true Prologue and the EndNote.

In closing, here are three of the testimonials from late November chosen because they each hone in on the ending:  

                  ° ° °

“What a book! You are an exceptional author. The story moves right along. I found the interwoven plots were intricate but easy to follow. The details of Greta salvaging a family business while Alex has a go at trying to find a long-lost gold mine were fascinating. But the abrupt, surprise ending left me uneasy.” —D. Norris, author of, “I’ll Go-Reflections from 61 Years of Ministry.”

                  ° ° °

“It’s 3 AM Wednesday morning in wintery Cleveland and I just finished the book. Could not put it down. It’s solid, front to back. I liked the ending and saw it coming.” —J. Cindrich, Croatia, and USA

                  ° ° °

“I found Alex, 34, and the two supporting men, Quid, 27, and Frank, 65, to be well-developed characters. I could easily conjure images of Alex as a handsome, hi-tech geologist and professor as well as a romantic; Frank,65, a wizened but wise gold prospector with a big heart; and Quid, Alex’s reckless younger brother who was both funny and dangerous at times. I was less able to connect with wealthy Greta, 32, the primary woman in the story. While I appreciated Brandt’s focus on portraying her as a knowledgeable, assertive business-woman with political ambitions, I felt she lacked depth and warmth. Despite my feelings about Greta, I appreciated the book’s realistic conclusion, which was satisfying and likely, given the page-turner subtleties of the story. Additionally, the book appears to have been professionally edited, as I only noted a few errors in Greta’s lively business-turnaround efforts and Alex, her lover’s, high-risk gold-seeking gamble. I recommend it to readers who enjoy modern adventures and the relationship stresses and joys they can produce. I also think the actual historical roots of the characters and reality of the narrative added authenticity to this work of fiction.” —Cecilia L., a professional reviewer for the OnlineBookClub of over half-million active members. Note: The Full Review is Condensed here. 

Steve

 

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EXCITING TIMES FOR “A Woman’s Prerogative”

You can order a Print or eBook edition by clicking on the Amazon logo above.

A Woman’s Prerogative is making steady inroads into the wild jungle of the adult novels marketplace. The book is drawing good reviews and testimonials from both women and men. It fits perfectly into these, our times, e.g. the issues, feelings, actions, and outcomes surrounding the recent Mid-Term Elections. And readers seem to become quickly engaged in the twists and turns of Greta and Alex’s relationship that are complicated by the risk-taking they each take on in their separate careers as they travel their 30’s seeking to prove themselves to themselves and others.  

Below is one testimonial from a professional book reviewer who reviewed the book this month, November 2018. In addition, there are a few more excerpts directly from the book.

Recent Testimonial:

“I found Alex, 34, and the two supporting men, Quid, 27, and Frank, 65, to be well-developed characters. I could easily conjure images of Alex as a handsome, hi-tech geologist and professor as well as a romantic; Frank, 65, a wizened but wise gold prospector with a big heart; and Quid, Alex’s reckless younger brother who was both funny and dangerous at times. I was less able to connect with wealthy Greta, 32, the primary woman in the story. While I appreciated Brandt’s focus on portraying her as a knowledgeable, assertive businesswoman with political ambitions, I felt she lacked depth and warmth. Despite my feelings about Greta, I appreciated the book’s realistic conclusion, which was satisfying and likely, given the page-turner subtleties of the story. Additionally, the book appears to have been professionally edited, as I only noted a few errors in Greta’s lively business-turnaround efforts and Alex, her lover’s, high-risk gold-seeking gamble. I recommend it to readers who enjoy romantic adventures and the relationship stresses and joys they can produce. I also think the actual historical roots of the characters and much of the content added authenticity to this work of fiction.” -Cecilia L., a professional reviewer for the OnlineBookClub of over half-million active members. Nov 2018

Excerpts from Book:

From Chapter 8

Greta remained as excited as the three prospectors as the weeks of June and July mushed together in a blur. She was less than a month into her new position as the Sadler Corporation Treasurer and finding it challenging as well as educational. Alex kept her in the loop as the preparations for the search for the long-lost gold mine proceeded. She asked him to do so and he was happy to have her as his “fourth prospector,” as he called her from time to time.

Excerpt from Chapter 11

“Señores, I am going to kill you one at a time, and we will bury you on Deadman Pass with your ancestors. “Two of the banditos twisted around without moving their feet. “Put your hands where I can see them,” came Quid’s calm voice again. All the two banditos could see was the campfire reflecting off the barrel of a large pistol aimed at them. Except for the lower arm, the holder of the pistol was out of sight in the protection of a large fir tree, in the dark.

“Now, you there with the shotgun in your arms…

Excerpt from another Chapter

She pulled Alex to her and put his arms around her neck. “Just love me,” she sighed. He pecked her closed lips slowly, left to right; she reciprocated going right to left on his. The firelight danced on the ceiling. His lips opened slightly and the tips of their tongues touched; a shudder passed through each. Then their tongues tangled together. Greta’s breathing increased and soon they were caressing each other’s bodies with their hands. Slowly they moved over hills and valleys as their kisses became deeper…deeper…

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More Excerpts from “A Woman’s Prerogative”

                                                                                                                      August 7, 2018

You can order a Print or eBook edition by clicking on the Amazon logo above.

Hello again. Here are a few more excerpts for various chapters in my new novel, a Romantic Thriller with Historical Roots.

From an early chapter:

“I’ve known for three years this moment would arrive. It had to. Greta softly pushed him back to arm’s length and smoothed her skirt as she paused to pick her words. “Alex, please listen to me. I do have to prove myself, at least to myself. I’m not a goddess like you think. Only two people truly know my story, my father and me. I have waited to tell you my secrets; it’s been painful…and heavy on me.”  

From a later chapter:

Alex turned to Quid. “Quid, you cannot tell your girlfriends even one tiny thing about our plans. Not one! And the same goes for you, Frank. We don’t need your Dutch Flat lady friends showing up on Deadman Pass on horseback looking for you or seducing you at home for information between now and August.” Frank chuckled and grinned again.

From another later chapter:

“Will you marry me?” His thoughts had rewound back to the long minutes when he was alone, deserted. 
“Yes,” she answered softly. “I will.” She smiled and tilted her martini glass toward him.

Alex was seated on the floor and leaning against the sofa where she was partially stretched out. She tickled his neck with a bare, big toe.

“When?” he asked.
“Soon.“What does that mean”
“Before long,” she whispered, and she reached down and caressed his head with her left hand.
++++++++

Steve

Visit the Official SCB website & blog: www.scbwords.com  for up to date info on the availability of the book. For example, as of today, you can PRE-ORDER either the print or the eBook edition from Amazon.com  Go to Books Department and enter Steven C. Brandt or click on the Amazon logo above.

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WHAT ARE THE “HISTORICAL ROOTS” UNDER “A WOMAN’S PREROGATIVE?

This novel is classified as a Romantic Thriller with Historical Roots. I’ve been asked about the roots. Let me give you a short answer first: Read the Prologue (2+ pages) at the beginning of Chapter 1. As you complete the book, be sure to read the Endnote at THE END. These two relate to the contents of the book like roots to the contents of a tree.  

The long answer is just below: The actual PROLOGUE from the start of Chapter 1.

PROLOGUE

People named Sadler immigrated to America from Prussia in the ten years between the California Gold Rush of 1849 and the discovery of
the Comstock Lode of silver in northern Nevada in 1859. One of those who took the journey was a Reinhold Sadler. He made his way to Reno and adjacent Virginia City, Nevada near the Comstock mines.

At age 26 Reinhold married Louise Zadow in Hamilton, a silver boom town in central Nevada. In 1869 Hamilton reached its peak with an estimated 12,000 residents, 100 saloons, sixty general stores, theaters, dance halls, and a Miners’ Union Hall. By the mid-1870s Hamilton had declined to less than 3,000 residents and Reinhold had moved his family to nearby Eureka where he worked as a miner, merchant, and miller. Over time, he and his wife had six children. He was elected treasurer of Eureka County in 1880 and became the ninth Governor of Nevada from 1896–1903. He died in 1906.

Twenty-three years later a great-great-grandson was born and named Reinhold Sadler after the Governor. The second Reinhold Sadler is a character in the story that follows.

                                                                          —

People named Mackenzie immigrated to America from Scotland and settled in New York City in the 1700s. In the years ahead, a number of Mackenzies became well-known American politicians and naval officers. Some of the Mackenzies from Scotland started in New York but went on to Montreal, Canada in 1778 during the American War of Independence with Britain. One was Alexander Mackenzie who became a Canadian hero at age 29 after he led a small, exploring party entirely across the raw continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific Oceans in 1793. They were the first Europeans to make the journey across North America and they preceded the more famous Lewis and Clark expedition across America that happened twelve years later in 1805. Sir Alexander Mackenzie was knighted by the British Empire and the second longest river in North America was named after him because he discovered it while searching for a way to the Pacific. He died in 1820, back in his native Scotland.

An American couple named Mackenzie living in Louisville, Kentucky had their first-born son in 1972. They had studied their ancestors and decided to name their son Alexander Mackenzie. In his late teens, Alex felt the call of the West and chose a college in Colorado where he studied geology. He continued west and achieved a Ph.D. in Geology and satellite technology at the University of California in Berkeley. It was there in 2003 he met Ms. Greta Sadler of Reno, Nevada.

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